Cumulative Impacts Project
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'Cumulative impacts' refers to the total harm to human health and the environment that results from combinations of assaults and stressors over time. The Cumulative Impacts Project is dedicated to promoting science, law, and policy that will reduce cumulative impacts.
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Ecosystems/Climate Change
Communities/Environmental Justice
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Studies that recognize
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cumulative impacts:
Diseases
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Exposures
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cumulative
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cumulative impacts:
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Results are sorted by date. 10 matches found.

Added 09/21/2015

Race/ethnic disparities in cumulative impacts

Study: non-whites more exposed to environmental hazards. Brooks Hays, UPI, September 17, 2015. According to a new study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, African Americans and Hispanics are more exposed to health risks like air pollution, toxic waste and a lack of green space. Risk exposure for Hispanics was 6.2 times higher than whites, and 5.8 times higher for African Americans. 
[See the study: Racial/ethnic disparities in cumulative environmental health impacts in California: evidence from a statewide environmental justice screening tool (CalEnviroScreen 1.1) and a related article: Hidden toxins contaminate Black homes]

  • Scope: Human Health, Communities/Environmental Justice
  • Focus: Socioeconomic, Exposures, Examples

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Added 09/14/2015

Information plus organizing to make real change

Community-based participatory science is changing the way research happens -- and what happens next. Judy Robinson, The Equation, September 9, 2015. In both the dollar store research and the oil and gas science, the effect of the science was to strengthen existing organizing campaigns for community-based solutions. The "good old days" when we waited for scientific proof to change the world are over, if they ever existed. Now science and citizen organizing together are changing the rules of the game, the outcome, and who gets to play.

  • Scope: Human Health, Communities/Environmental Justice
  • Focus: Socioeconomic, Principles, Best practices, Exposures

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Added 09/08/2015

Cancer risk to California Residents from Air Contaminants

Ambient and Emission Trends of Toxic Air Contaminants in California. Ralph Propper, Patrick Wong, Son Bui, Jeff Austin, William Vance, Alvaro Alvarado, Bart Croes, and Dongmin Luo, Environmental Science & Technology, September 4, 2015. The collective cancer risk from exposure to these seven reviewed toxic air contaminants [benzene, 1,3-butadiene, perchloroethylene, hexavalent chromium, diesel particulate matter, formaldehyde and acetaldehyde] declined 76%. Significant reduction in cancer risk to California residents from implementation of air toxics controls (especially for diesel particulate matter) is expected to continue. 

  • Scope: Human Health, Communities/Environmental Justice
  • Focus: Exposures

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Added 06/29/2015

Certain properties of environmental contaminates increase fetus vulnerability and exposure

Fetuses more vulnerable to some environmental contaminants penetrating into cord blood. Medical Xpress. June 26, 2015. A new research featured in the Environmental Science and Technology published by the American Chemical Society suggests that the fetus is more vulnerable to some pollutants with certain properties because they penetrate further into the feto-maternal system. 
[See the study: Partitioning behavior of heavy metals and persistent organic pollutants among feto-maternal bloods and tissues]

  • Scope: Human Health, Communities/Environmental Justice
  • Focus: Exposures

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Added 06/01/2015

The Great Barrier Reef is in peril: Federal and Queensland governments must get serious

Development and the Reef: the rules have been lax for too long. Bob Pressey, Alana Grech, Jon C. Day, and Marcus Sheaves, The Conversation. May 28, 2015. Through coastal development, people have changed the Reef's coastal zone dramatically, and the direct result is the decline of the Reef's ecosystems. No single development has tipped the balance, but a litany of poor choices has resulted in a tyranny of small decisions, with a large cumulative impact.

[This article is part of a series examining in depth the various threats to the Great Barrier Reef.] 

  • Scope: Communities/Environmental Justice, Ecosystems/Climate Change
  • Focus: Principles, Best practices, Planning & strategies, Methods, Current law

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Added 06/01/2015

B.C. under pressure to better evaluate and monitor natural resource development

B.C.’s environmental assessment office is doing a better job at monitoring major natural-resource projects such as mines and power generation, B.C.’s auditor general, Carol Bellringer, has reported in a follow-up to a damning 2011 audit that found major gaps. In another report released this past week, Bellringer said government does not adequately consider what are termed “cumulative effects” of natural-resource development. She gave the example of a logging operation, which leads to mining, then cattle grazing and, finally, water draw for mining and agriculture.
  • Scope: Communities/Environmental Justice, Ecosystems/Climate Change
  • Focus: Principles, Best practices, Decision tools, Current law

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Added 05/15/2015

Antibiotic use at early ages linked to diseases in adulthood

Infant antibiotic use linked to adult diseases. Pajau Vangay, Tonya Ward, Jeffrey S. Gerber, et al. Cell Host and Microbe, 17 (5). May 13, 2015. A new study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota has found a three-way link among antibiotic use in infants, changes in the gut bacteria, and disease later in life. The imbalances in gut microbes, called dysbiosis, have been tied to infectious diseases, allergies and other autoimmune disorders, and even obesity, later in life. Medical Xpress.
[See the study: Antibiotics, pediatric dysbiosis, and disease]

  • Scope: Human Health
  • Focus: Methods, Exposures, Diseases, Decision tools

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Added 05/15/2015

Social sciences central in understanding environmental health and justice

Social Science Collaboration with Environmental Health. Elizabeth Hoover, Mia Renauld, Michael R. Edelstein, and Phil Brown. Environmental Health Perspectives. May 12, 2015. Social science-environmental health team science has altered the way scientists traditionally explore exposure by pressing for cumulative exposure approaches and providing research data for policy applications. 

  • Scope: Human Health, Communities/Environmental Justice
  • Focus: Socioeconomic, Best practices, Methods, Exposures, Ecosystem, Diseases

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Added 04/02/2015

Working with hormone-mimicking chemicals over the long term could increase lymphoma risk

Occupational exposure to chemicals may up lymphoma risk for men. Kathryn Doyle, Reuters, March 26, 2015. Men who work with hormone-mimicking chemicals for at least 30 years have a higher risk of cancers of the lymph tissue than others, according to a long-term observational study in several European countries. Reuters Health.
[See the study: Occupational exposure to endocrine disruptors and lymphoma risk in a multi-centric European study]

  • Scope: Human Health, Communities/Environmental Justice
  • Focus: Best practices, Methods, Exposures, Diseases, Decision tools

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Added 04/02/2015

Incorporating the microbiome into basic 1987 model can spur new advances

Biomarkers for the 21st Century: listening to the microbiome. Rodney Reynolds Dietert and Ellen Kovner Silbergeld, Toxicological Sciences, March 24, 2015. Incorporating the microbiome into the basic 1987 model can spur new advances and understanding in environmental health. This article reviews the complexities of host:microbiome responses to xenobiotics in terms of redefining toxicokinetics and susceptibility. 

  • Scope: Human Health
  • Focus: Best practices, Methods, Exposures, Ecosystem

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Updated September 21, 2015

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